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Common Knowledge about Front Wheel Bearings (4)

This means that the next time the brakes are applied, the calipers piston(s) have to be pushed further outward than the few thousands of an inch that they are designed to travel. You feel the result in your foot. The brake pedal has to be pushed further to the floor to engage the brakes. You'll find yourself pumping the brakes every time you use them to get the pedal up.


This means that the next time the brakes are applied, the calipers piston(s) have to be pushed further outward than the few thousands of an inch that they are designed to travel. You feel the result in your foot. The brake pedal has to be pushed further to the floor to engage the brakes. You'll find yourself pumping the brakes every time you use them to get the pedal up.

This is frustrating because when you bleed the brakes, they feel fine. A hard, high pedal, every time. It's only after you drive the car that you have the problem.

 

So how do you tighten your front wheel bearings correctly to avoid these problems? The way I've always done it is to tighten the nut slowly as I spin the drum or rotor (with the tire and wheel off). At the point where the drum or rotor starts to slow down as I'm tightening the nut, I stop tightening. I then tighten the nut another 1/4 turn and put the nut cap and cotter pin in to lock the nut on the spindle and keep the adjustment. But I do not bend the cotter pin yet.

 

I then put the tire and wheel on and check the play by rocking the tire and wheel top to bottom. If it is tight, I then spin the tire and wheel. It should make a couple of revolutions before stopping. I then recheck the tightness by rocking the tire and wheel top to bottom again. If everything checks out, then I bend the cotter pin and put on the dust cap. If there is any question about it being right, I start over. Sometimes it takes a couple of cycles to get it right. After I've driven the car about 200 miles, I jack the car back up and recheck the tightness by rocking the tire and wheel as above.

 

If new front wheel bearings have been installed, rechecking after a couple of hundred of miles is an important step. Sometimes, for various reasons, one or both of the loose races do not seat properly in the hub. Driving the car seats the races and if they were not seated properly, you will now have a loose front wheel bearing. Maybe even both will be loose! Remember, if this happens and you've had a front end alignment done after the new wheel bearings were installed, you'll need to have the front end alignment checked.

 

Find out more about wheel hub bearing China manufacturer by visit daybec.com.

 



 

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR


Olivia Tong is the freelance writer for e-commerce website tahiko.com and miparts.com offers the buyers around the world to find quality and discount auto parts. We try our best to aggregate leads in the business world, and let these leads benefit the entire business person.

 



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