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Fixing Paperback Books With Your Thermal Binding Machine

Reading is a terrific pastime that's enjoyed by people of all ages. Paperbacks are incredibly popular because they're less expensive than hardcovers, are smaller and lighter (and thus, more portable), and often have extras in the back such as author interviews and discussion questions. This article will walk you through the process so you can get back to reading.

Reading is a terrific pastime that's enjoyed by people of all ages. Paperbacks are incredibly popular because they're less expensive than hardcovers, are smaller and lighter (and thus, more portable), and often have extras in the back such as author interviews and discussion questions. For all their advantages over hardcover tomes, paperbacks do have one major disadvantage: they can fall apart after they've been handled a lot. However, it's possible to fix them with a thermal binding machine. This article will walk you through the process so you can get back to reading.

First off, the reasons why paperbacks fall apart so easily is because the spine cracks. This is especially true in older books as well as ones that were produced by publishers that use less expensive adhesives. If you want to fix this problem, you can use your thermal binding machine to melt the adhesive and rebind the book. At this point, make sure your machine is turned on and ready to go.

Once your machine is ready, place the book in the opening so that the adhesive can melt. When the glue is soft, take the book out of your machine and gently tap the spine on a hard surface (i.e. a countertop) to set the pages and line everything up. You should let the book cool off before using it so that the binding is secure. If you have other tomes you need to fix, feel free to do so. (You might want to work with a bunch of volumes in one sitting so you can get it over with.)

As you're working, you may come across a book with a detached spine. If you do, you can fix the tome with a thermal binding strip. These strips come in different lengths so you should be able to find some that are perfect for your needs. (If they're too long, just trim them with a pair of scissors. The strips are usually about 1" thick which is a pretty good width for most paperbacks.) Slide the strip inside the book and then put it in your thermal binding machine. After the binding cycle is completeFeature Articles, remove the tome from the machine and let it cool off. That's all you need to do.

You can use these techniques in a variety of environments including the home which is great for people who are committed readers. This is also a great way to take care of well-circulated library titles and it can also be done in the classroom. (Make sure that any children within the area of the device are supervised.) Fixing your books with a thermal binding machine is very easy and it will help you get the most out of them. (It will also help you save money because you won't need new copies of your favorite and/or important titles. That will really add up over the years if you read a lot.) Consider fixing your books with a thermal binding machine today so you can continue reading.

Article Tags: Thermal Binding Machine, Thermal Binding, Binding Machine

Source: Free Articles from ArticlesFactory.com

ABOUT THE AUTHOR


Jeff McRitchie is the Director of Marketing for MyBinding.com. He regularly writes articles, reviews, and blog posts on topics related to bookbinding, laminating, paper shredding, and office equipment. More than 2,500 of his articles have been published in thousands of locations on the Internet. If you're looking for information about thermal binding machines his articles are a great place to start.



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