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How to Edit Thermally Bound Documents

One of the main benefits of thermal binding is that you can edit your documents at a later date. This can be very handy, especially when you have the frustrating experience of looking over your work and discovering a typo or two you did not catch the first time.

One of the main benefits of thermal binding is that you can edit your documents at a later date. This can be very handy, especially when you have the frustrating experience of looking over your work and discovering a typo or two you didn't catch the first time. Or maybe some of the pages aren't relevant anymore or you have found that you need to add more to cover some forgotten ground. Whatever the case may be, you can edit your work by going back to your thermal binding machine. Let's take a look at how you can edit your documents.

Removing pages:

So, you've discovered that sneaky little (or big) typo that managed to sneak through. To get rid of the offending sheet, here's what you need to do:

  • First, warm up your machine if necessary. When it's ready, place the document on the heating element so the adhesive in the spine will become soft.
  • Then, grab a hold of the pages you want to remove. Be sure to also grab the front cover and the rest of the document so you don't inadvertently yank the entire thing off the machine.
  • Wait until the machine signals that the binding cycle is complete. When that happens, gently remove the pages. If you encounter resistance, let the adhesive warm up for a bit longer, then try again.
  • Finally, tap the book so that the other pages can go back into place. Let the document cool off. You are done!

Adding pages:

If you find that you need to add a sheet or two, the process is pretty similar to the one outlined above. This is how you do it:

  • Take your document and insert your new pages into the appropriate spots. Then warm up the machine if you need to.
  • Put the book on the machine and start the binding cycle.
  • When the cycle is over, you're ready to position the pages. Do this with your fingers and make sure the pages are all flush with each other. If necessary, tap the document.
  • Let your work cool off. That's it.

A few caveats before you give this type of editing a try. First, due to the nature of thermal covers, you can only add or remove a few sheets at a time. This is because you need to put the right amount of sheets into the cover. Otherwise, the document won't be bound properly and sheets can easily fall out of it. Also, you can only edit your book a couple of times. Doing it more than that will make the adhesive useless, which means you've wasted a binding cover and need to totally re-bind your work. If you find that you're having to edit thermally bound books on a regular basis, be sure to thoroughly proofread your work and fix it (if necessary) before placing it on the machine. It will save you time and make your workday less frustrating.

Finally, keep in mind that this kind of editing can take a bit of practice. If you don't get it right the first timeFree Articles, don't give up and keep trying. You'll be a pro in no time. Good luck and happy binding!

Article Tags: Edit Thermally Bound, Edit Thermally, Thermally Bound

Source: Free Articles from ArticlesFactory.com

ABOUT THE AUTHOR


If you'd like to purchase a Thermal Binding System for your office, you should really visit MyBinding.com. They have a great selection of these devices as well as a wide assortment of Pouch and Roll Laminators. Plus, you'll get free shipping on every order over $75.00. Check it out for yourself now!



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