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How to Use a Unibind Binding Machine

Thermal binding is one of the most popular document finishing methods for a couple of key reasons. For one thing, thermal binding can make your documents look like they were professionally bound. Second, this method is really easy, especially with machines made by Unibind. Unibind is a European company that has an office in the United States and their thermal binding machines are user-friendly. In fact, they are so user-friendly that they are perfect for beginners as well as anyone who wants to bind his/her documents without a lot of hassle.

Thermal binding is one of the most popular document finishing methods for a couple of key reasons. For one thing, thermal binding can make your documents look like they were professionally bound. Second, this method is really easy, especially with machines made by Unibind. Unibind is a European company that has an office in the United States and their thermal binding machines are user-friendly. In fact, they're so user-friendly that they are perfect for beginners as well as anyone who wants to bind his/her documents without a lot of hassle. If you just got one of these devices, you're probably wondering how to use it. Here's how you do it, step-by-step:

  • First, plug in the machine and turn it on if you haven't already. Unibind machines don't need to warm up before use so you will be able to start binding right away.

  • Now you need to choose a binding case for your document. You need to use Unibind supplies because they have a piece of metal in the spine. When the spine comes into contact with the machine's heating element, the adhesive is activated and your document is bound. If you really want to impress people, choose a hardcover case. It will make your work look great.

  • Place the pages of your document in the cover. You need to make sure all of the pages are flush and that they're touching the adhesive in the spine. When your document is ready, place it on your machine's heating element. The binding cycle only lasts for about 90 seconds. When your work is ready, a green light will go on to indicate you can move the document to the cooling rack. Don't flip through the document before it's had the chance to cool off. The adhesive needs to set in order to create a secure binding.

  • Most Unibind devices can accommodate multiple documents at once so you can reduce the amount of time you spend binding. Keep in mind that this binding capacity depends on both the thickness of your documents and how many heating elements your device has. (For example, the XU138 only has one heating element while the XU338 has three, so it can bind more at once.)

  • After all your documents have been bound, turn off your machine so you can save power. Cutting the power supply will also help extend the life of the machine.

Unibind machines are easy to use, as this article illustrates. The most important thing to keep in mind are that you need to use Unibind supplies with your machine so that the adhesive in the spine will be activated. AlsoFree Articles, try binding more than one document at once. Your machine is well-equipped to handle multiple documents and processing more than one book at a time will make you more productive. And don't forget that using hardcover cases can make your documents look their best and give your work a more professional image. Good luck and happy binding!


Article Tags: Thermal Binding, Heating Element

Source: Free Articles from ArticlesFactory.com

ABOUT THE AUTHOR


Jeff McRitchie is the Vice-President of Marketing for MyBinding.com. He regularly writes articles, reviews, and blog posts on topics related to bookbinding, laminating, paper shredding, and office equipment. More than 2,500 of his reviews have been published in thousands of locations on the Internet. If you're looking for information about thermal binding machines, his articles are a great place to start.



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