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Six Tips for Binding Documents With Spiral Coil

Spiral coil binding is one of the most popular binding styles used today. It offers a contemporary look and feel with some great features such as full three hundred and sixty degree rotation. . This article will provide you with six simple tips for binding your documents with spiral coil. Here they are.

Spiral coil binding is one of the most popular binding styles used today. It offers a contemporary look and feel with some great features such as full three hundred and sixty degree rotation. However, binding documents with spiral coil can be a little bit tricky, especially if you have never done it before. This article will provide you with six simple tips for binding your documents with spiral coil. Here they are.
  1. There are several different hole patterns used for spiral coil binding. The most common hole pattern is 4:1 pitch (four holes per inch). However, spiral coil spines are also available in 5:1 pitch (five holes per inch) and in 3:1 pitch (three holes per inch). More than 90% of users choose a 4:1 pitch machine since the supplies are easier to find and less expensive. However, it is also important to note that some 4:1 pitch punches use a 43 hole pattern while others use a 44 hole pattern. If you decide to order pre punched covers or need to match a hole pattern from an existing document you will need to count the holes to make sure that you end up with the appropriate number of holes.
  2. Using oversized covers with your coil binding machine is not recommended. In fact, many coil binding machines are not capable of handling oversized covers. When you try to punch an oversized cover with a coil binding machine the holes may not line up with the paper that you have punched or you may end up with extra holes.
  3. Most coil binding machines do not have fully disengageable dies. This means that you can not choose to stop a single pin from punching. This makes it difficult to bind odd sized books and documents with your machine. Most coil binding machines are capable of binding letter and half letter sized documents. If you are going to need to bind smaller or larger documents, it is recommended that you choose a machine with fully or partially disengageable dies.
  4. Once you have the holes punched in your document you will need to spin the coil onto the spine of your book. Start by taking the spiral coil and spinning through the first few holes of the document by hand. If you have a machine with a spiral coil inserter on it, you can use the roller from your inserter to spin the element the rest of the way onto the document. However, be careful that you don't spin the book right off the other side. If you don't have an electric inserter, you will need to simply spin the coil onto the book by hand.
  5. The final step in finishing a book bound with spiral coil is to crimp the ends of the coil so that the spiral doesn't spin back off the book. Special coil crimping pliers are used to cut off the excess coil and bend over the end in a single step. It is possible to achieve the same results using a pair of needle nosed pliers but it is much more difficult and will require multiple steps. If you do have a pair of crimping pliers it is important to remember two things. The red dot should always face the ceiling and the spine of the book should always face towards you.
  6. Binding documents that are less than one inch thick is fairly simple with colorcoil. However, binding documents that are larger than an inch can be somewhat difficult. In order to bind larger documents you will need to form the spine of the document so that it matches the curved shape of the coils that you are planning to insert. Most coil binding machines have a spine shaper built into them. HoweverHealth Fitness Articles, if you are planning on binding lots of thick documents using coil you might want to consider buying a stand alone spine forming device. You should also note that you most likely will not be able to use your coil inserter for thicker documents. You will need to spin the coils on by hand.

These are five simple things to remember when binding documents with spiral coil binding. Good luck and happy coilbinding.

Article Tags: Spiral Coil Binding, Coil Binding Machines, Most Coil Binding, Binding Documents, Spiral Coil, Coil Binding, Hole Pattern, Binding Machines, Most Coil

Source: Free Articles from ArticlesFactory.com

ABOUT THE AUTHOR


Jeff McRitchie is the designer and Director of Marketing for MyBinding.com. He has written over 100 articles on binding machines,binding covers,binders,laminators,binding supplies,laminating supplies,paper handling equipments,index tabs, and shredders.



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