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Spiral Coil Binding Basics

One of the most common methods used for binding documents is spiral coil binding.Using spiral coil binding takes a little practice. Armed with the tips in this article, you'll be well on your way to becoming a spiral coil binding veteran.

One of the most common methods used for binding documents is spiral coil binding. It is popular because of its modern look and functionality. Using spiral coil binding takes a little practice. Armed with the tips in this article, you'll be well on your way to becoming a spiral coil binding veteran.

Spiral coil binding can be done using several different hole patterns. The hole pattern is described in terms of pitch. Pitch represents the number of holes per inch. 4:1 pitch is chosen by the overwhelming majority of people, although 5:1 and 3:1 pitch are also available. When using the 4:1 pitch, please remember that even though the pitch is standardized, the total number of holes varies. Some systems use 43 holes, and others use 44. Be careful when purchasing prepunched items for spiral coil binding projects and double-check the number of holes your binding system uses.

You may be tempted to use oversized covers for binding your documents; however, this is not a good idea. Not only is it difficult to handle a larger cover, but when you attempt to align the punched paper with the cover, you will most likely end up with extra holes.

Because the majority of coil binding machines are not equipped with disengageable dies, it is difficult to create spiral bound documents in nonstandard sizes. Some spiral binding machines and modular punches are available with disengageable dies to allow for the creation of other sizes of documents. Disengageable dies allow users to prevent individual pins from punching holes so that you don't end up with a half hole on the edge of your sheets.

Once you have properly punched the holes into the document, the next step is to insert the spiral coil into the holes. To do this, you take the spiral coil and spin it through the holes on the edge of your book. Some machines are equipped with a spiral coil inserter. Pay attention as you do this to ensure you don't spin the spine right off the other side of your proposal.

That said, the last thing you need to do is crimp the coil's ends to keep the spiral coil in place. For best results, you should do this with coil crimping pliers. Keep the spine facing towards you and the red indicator dot facing up. While you could attempt use needle nosed pliers, it will likely be an exercise in frustration to do so.

Most documents under one inch thick are easy to bind with colorcoil; however, larger documents can be tricky. To prepare to insert the binding, you will need to arrange the document so that it is appropriately curved where the coils will be inserted. Although the majority of coil binding machines include spine shapers, you may want to consider purchasing a separate spine-forming device if you need to bind many thick documents. You should also note that you will most likely not be able to use your inserter for large diameter coil book binding. With this background information in mind, you have a good foundation in the basics of spiral coil binding. While you may not become a master of spiral coil binding immediatelyBusiness Management Articles, with a little practice you will develop an eye and hand for this great book-binding style.

Article Tags: Spiral Coil Binding, Spiral Coil, Coil Binding, Binding Machines, Disengageable Dies

Source: Free Articles from ArticlesFactory.com

ABOUT THE AUTHOR


Jeff McRitchie is the designer and Director of Marketing for MyBinding.com. He has written over 100 articles on binding machines,binding covers,binders,laminators,binding supplies,laminating supplies,paper handling equipments,index tabs, and shredders.



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