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Tennis Courts - Bringing Respect and Etiquette to Your Facility

No matter where you live, you can usually find some good tennis courts in the area. There are some basic rules of respect and etiquette you should bring with you when playing.

No matter where you live, you can usually find some good tennis courts in the area. Some may require that you pay to use them, while others are free. Regardless of which type you like to use, there are some basic rules of respect and etiquette you should bring with you when visiting. These may not be written rules after all, few recreational facilities want to stifle your ability to have a good time with endless codes of conduct. Nonetheless, if you go into your game with these ideas in mind, you'll make the games much more enjoyable for both yourself and the others in attendance.

Opponents

Whether you're playing with friends, strangers, or in a serious competitive situation, there are some basic rules of etiquette you should bring to your opponents. Shaking hands is one of these rules that can keep the match friendly and prevent the inherent competitiveness from moving into a "personal" zone. Give your opponent a handshake both before and after a match. While John McEnroe may have made swearing on the tennis courts something to chuckle at and even admire, you aren't a superstar of his status. Keep the swearing under your breath and otherwise don't befoul the game with language.

Observing

If the tennis courts you frequent are popular, you may have to watch a couple of games before getting to play. You should be respectful during this time. If you've ever watched the game on television, you'll have a good idea of how to behave when others are playing. In other words, keep quiet. It's also bad form to start sighing or looking at your watch (unless you have a scheduled play time, in which case you should contact the people in charge of the facilities). If you're watching a spectator-oriented game (such as a professional match), remember that this game differs from others in many ways. It may be perfectly fine to boo the umpire in a baseball game; the same is not true when it comes to booing the official in tennis.

Facilities

Go the extra mile when it comes to caring for the tennis courts themselves. This is especially true when it comes to those facilities which are free to use. At places where you have to pay to use the courts, you aren't going to get away with harming the facilities. At free facilities, there may be no one around to stop you. In this case, just police yourself. It's up to the community to decide how they want to care for their recreational spaces. Don't slam your racket into the ground, tear up the netScience Articles, or do anything else that will leave the place in worse condition than it was when you arrived.

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