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Animals Use Pheromones to Compete For Attention

When competing for the attention of a female, the male wild boar will spar with other males. He will lay his scent on trees and other objects to mark his territory, incorporating urine and dung into t...

When competing for the attention of a female, the male wild boar will spar with other males. He will lay his scent on trees and other objects to mark his territory, incorporating urine and dung into the staking of his claim. After this has been accomplished, the male will advance toward the female. If she doesn’t turn and ee, he will begin to rub his snout over her body, urinating and grunting at the same time. As the boar prances around the female, he delivers to her an invisible bouquet of pheromones. Many times, the tactics work and the female allows the male to mount her.

Horsing Around

When a stallion gets a whiff of a mare in heat, he slips into I what appears to be overly aggressive behavior: When this happens, the stallion knows he is on the way toward accomplishing his goal copulation.

He moves closer to the mare, preparing to snort her urine by curling his lips back and aring his nostrils in a gesture called ebmen. By performing flebmen, the stallion enhances his sensitivity to the mare’s taste and moves her pheromones into his VNO. A “reading” of this sort tells him the state of the mare’s reproductive health and the propriety of his advances. Learn about pheromone science at http://astrobiosociety.org/pheromones-science/

Camels, deer, zebras, giraffes, and rhinos also use the pheromone sniffing method and lip curl to determine the sexual availability of their females. The rhinoceros is the most skilled at urine (and pheromone) spraying. A rhino can send a twelve—foot stream of urine to broadcast his presence. This action is akin to fencing off an area and putting up a sign that says KEEP OUT: TRESPASSERS WILL BE PROSECUTED.

It’s next to impossible to not notice a bull elephant in a state of sexual excitement. Indeed, the male is so aroused and prone to fits of extreme aggression that some zoos won't keep male elephants on the premises. There is a one-word reason for this prejudice: musth.

Musth means “intoxicated” in Urdu. A bull elephant experiencing musth, which can last up to two months, does act as if he’s consumed too much liquor and is pressing for a bar brawl with anyone who will participate.

The cause of musth is the bull’s raging testosterone levels, which are pumped up to fifty times normal. With rivers of sex hormone coursing through his veins, the bull elephant is unpredictable and edgy—and definitely in the mood for some attention from a female (cow) elephant.

 What the male elephant really wants is to find a cow in heat; when he does, he will watch over her like a harem master, waving off with ear-splitting bellows and threatening gesture.

A male in musth exhibits several unmistakable signs, including a preoccupation with marking anything in his path with a gooey secretion produced in the temporal glands on the sides of his face. He will graffiti the local vegetation with this secretion, either by rubbing the glands against trees or shrubs or by touching his trunk to the secretions and then smearing the substance around. He will also spend a great deal of time autographing his territory with his pungentFree Reprint Articles, pheromone-laden urine.

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR


Alexander P is a blogger that studies pheromones.



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