Free Articles, Free Web Content, Reprint Articles
Monday, October 14, 2019
 
Free Articles, Free Web Content, Reprint ArticlesRegisterAll CategoriesTop AuthorsSubmit Article (Article Submission)ContactSubscribe Free Articles, Free Web Content, Reprint Articles
RELATED ARTICLES
 

What Else? 3X

As managers we know we are expected to engage employees in problem solving. We can't solve all the problems for them, right? We know that in the long run it's not a good idea to dictate answers and or...

As managers we know we are expected to engage employees
in problem solving. We can't solve all the problems for them, right?
We know that in the long run it's not a good idea to dictate answers and orders. They'll never learn to work on their own. In this quest to engage employees we ask open-ended questions like:

·      What ideas do you have?

·      What options have you considered?

·      What are your thoughts on that issue?


Have you ever asked an employee for their ideas or input and gotten a luke warm response?
Have you heard these kind of answers to your attempts to engage the employee:

·      "I don't know..."

·      "I'm not really sure..."

·      "Hmm...."


You may not always get a detailed, enthusiastic response to your first question of an employee. Yet, we often give up our quest to give the employee a chance to participate when they don't immediately jump in.



We might give the employee our own answers. We tell them what we think about the situation. In a word, we take over. And, in the course of this exchange, the employee is let off the hook for owning the issue and becomes more dependent on you, the manager, to solve workplace problems. It's not good for you or the employee when you don't allow them to contribute.



The solution? Some might call it patience. I call it, "What Else? Three Times." The next time you attempt to engage an employee in a problem solving conversation, don't give up after your first try. Whether they contribute a productive response or not, follow your initial question with "What Else?"



"What Else?" sends a message that you:

·     Are open to multiple ideas or options

·     Expect the employee to fully engage in the conversation and own the outcome

·     Leave the responsibility for the issue with the employee

·     Are not going to dictate or take over the problem solving

·     Trust the employee to find a suitable solution

In fact, when you're met with little enthusiasm from the employee, make it a practice to give the employee three opportunities to add their perspective. By asking "What Else?" three times, you give the employee time to think and you don't let them off the hook.



Other encouraging phrases will also work. Say things like:

·     What other ideas do you have?

·     Tell me more...

·     What has crossed your mind related to...?

The "What Else? 3X" rule is a reminder that if we are to fully engage others in our collective work, we need to make space for them to contribute. Don't rush them to your solution. Because when you always come up with the answers yourselfFeature Articles, they'll wonder why you need them.

Source: Free Articles from ArticlesFactory.com

ABOUT THE AUTHOR


Marnie E. Green is Principal Consultant of the Chandler, AZ-based Management Education Group, Inc. Green is a speaker, author, and consultant who helps organizations develop confident leaders. Contact Green at phone: 480-705-9394 email: mgreen@managementeducationgroup.com web site: http://www.managementeducationgroup.com.

We offer this article on a nonexclusive basis. You may reprint or repost this material as long as Marnie Green's name and contact information are included.



Health
Business
Finance
Travel
Technology
Home Repair
Computers
Marketing
Autos
Family
Entertainment
Law
Education
Communication
Other
Sports
ECommerce
Home Business
Self Help
Internet
Partners


Page loaded in 0.015 seconds