Four Things You Should Know Before Buying a Wire Binding Machine

Mar 12 11:32 2008 Jeff McRitchie Print This Article

If you are looking for a solution to bind your own documents, reports, presentations and proposals, wire binding is certainly a great choice.However, before you rush out and buy a wire binding machine there are a few things that you should know. Here they are...

If you are looking for a solution to bind your own documents,Guest Posting reports, presentations and proposals, wire binding is certainly a great choice. The professional look of the double loop wire binding is a popular choice for engineers, architects, real estate agents and financial service organizations. In fact, double loop wire binding (also called wire-o binding) offers one of the most professional looks available on the market. However, before you rush out and buy a wire binding machine there are a few things that you should know. Here they are...

1. There are two types of twin loop wire binding machines. A 3:1 pitch wire binding machine is designed to punch a hole pattern with three holes per inch and is used to bind documents between 3/16" and 9/16". A 2:1 pitch wire binding machine is designed to punch a hole pattern with two holes per inch and is used to bind documents between 5/8" and 1-1/4". If you decide to purchase a 3:1 pitch wire binding machine and decide later that you need to bind larger sized documents you will be out of luck. With a 2:1 pitch wire binding machine you can actually buy small sized custom elements for small documents. However, these documents will not have the same tightly wound look that is popular with 3:1 pitch wire binding. If you anticipate needing to bind both large and small sized documents with wire binding your best bet is to purchase a binding system capable of punching both 2:1 pitch and 3:1 pitch patterns. This will offer you the flexibility to bind documents in all sizes up to 1-1/4" with your machine.

2. Twin loop wire binding elements come out of the box in a "C" shape. Most wire binding machines have a place to hang or hold the wire in place while you put the pages onto the wire element. You then have to take the wire binding spine and use the wire closer on your machine to squeeze the spine closed into a round shape. It can take some practice to move the book into the wire closer without having your spines fall out. Unfortunately apart from a high end electric wire closer, this is the process that is required for wire binding.

3. It is important to make sure that you purchase a twin loop wire binding machine that has an excellent quality wire closer. Cheaper wire binding machines can sometimes use plastic components and cheaper construction. Over time, the wire closers on these machines can begin to skew resulting in an uneven bind. Higher quality wire binding machines will use metal construction to ensure that the wire closer will not slip or skew over time.

4. Wire-O binding supplies are available in more than 14 different colors and a large number of sizes. Generally speaking, wire spines are stocked in 11" lengths for standard letter size documents. Spines for longer or shorter documents can be ordered in almost any length and take just a few days to have made. Large volume users will sometimes use wire on spools and use special machines to cut the spines to length. Spools are not recommended for low volume non automated users since they are susceptible to shipping damage and can become tangled easily.

Certainly there is more to wire binding than just these four things. However, understanding these four points will help you to make an informed decision when choosing a wire binding machine.

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About Article Author

Jeff McRitchie
Jeff McRitchie

Jeff McRitchie is the designer and Director of Marketing for MyBinding.com. He has written over 100 articles on binding machines, binding covers, binding supplies,laminators,laminating supplies,paper handling equipments,binders,index tabs, and shredders.

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