How to Bind a Small Booklet at Home

Aug 30 10:13 2011 Jeff McRitchie Print This Article

Do you need a way to bind a small booklet at home? If so, you will be glad to know that doing so is actually pretty easy. You just need the right equipment. Here are a few ways you can bind a document without leaving the comfort of your home:

Do you need a way to bind a small booklet at home? If so,Guest Posting you'll be glad to know that doing so is actually pretty easy. You just need the right equipment. Here are a few ways you can bind a document without leaving the comfort of your home:

  • Stapling. One of the fastest and least expensive ways to bind a booklet is by simply stapling the pages together. This isn't the most elegant binding method, but if you only have access to a stapler, it will do the trick. You can make the document look better by using a long-arm stapler to fasten the pages in the middle and then folding the paper in half.
  • Plastic comb binding. Even though plastic comb binding has been practiced for years, it's still as popular as ever. This document finishing method is pretty easy and the machines and supplies needed for it are quite affordable. The combs are great for thin documents. The thinnest ones can bind work that's up to 10 sheets, so be sure to consider this method when binding your booklets.
  • Using a booklet maker. If you bind booklets on a regular basis, you may want to invest in a booklet maker. A booklet maker will fold your pages and staple them quickly, so you can be done with your project in no time at all. A device such as this can also just fold your paper which can be helpful when you have things that need to go in the mail. The main drawback to getting one of these machines is obviously the cost, so be sure to take your budget into consideration.
  • Thermal binding. If you want your work to look its best, thermal binding is a great choice. This method will allow you to produce booklets that look like either paperback or hardcover books. When you use this method, you'll be able to crank out documents that have as few as 10 pages quickly. (A typical bookbinding cycle is only a couple minutes long.) Best of all, everything you bind will look like it was done by a professional.
  • Stitching. Finally, you can always try stitching the pages together. All you really need to do this is a needle, thread, and a hole punch so you don't have to puncture the paper with a needle. (This can be really difficult, especially if the booklet contains a good number of pages.) Aside from stapling, this is the most cost-effective way to assemble a book, so it's a great choice if you're on a budget.

These are a few ways you can bind booklets at home ranging the low-tech (stapling, stitching) to more professional methods (thermal binding) that will make your work look fantastic. When deciding on which method to use, consider your budget, the supplies you have available, and how often you need to put documents together. If you do so, you'll find the right method and will be able to produce your own booklets right at home. Good luck!


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About Article Author

Jeff McRitchie
Jeff McRitchie

Jeff McRitchie is the Vice-President of Marketing for MyBinding.com. He regularly writes articles, reviews, and blog posts on topics related to bookbinding, laminating, paper shredding, and office equipment. More than 2,500 of his articles have been published in thousands of locations on the Internet. If you're looking for information about binding machines, his articles are are a great place to start.

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