Keeping Hospitals Safe from Disaster and Flood

Oct 30 08:24 2012 Leighanna Cumbie Print This Article

It is hard to imagine that a place like a hospital could have dangerous mold and bacteria growing throughout the building.  It is also hard to think that a hospital could turn into a disaster zone from one water leak.  But just as homes and businesses have air quality issues and untimely floods, hospitals experience the scenarios.

It is hard to imagine that a place like a hospital could have dangerous mold and bacteria growing throughout the building.  It is also hard to think that a hospital could turn into a disaster zone from one water leak.  But just as homes and businesses have air quality issues and untimely floods,Guest Posting hospitals experience the scenarios.  Of course the major difference is that at a hospital, having bacteria laden waters dripping through ceiling tile, seeping into bed sheets, and soaking expensive machines is a life threatening scenario.  People come to hospitals to be made better, not to potentially expose themselves to even more medical issues.

 

It is the hospital’s duty to protect the lives of their patients at all costs.  So when a disastrous event such as a flood happens, no matter how minor, the staff kicks into a hyper awareness of all symptoms their patients experience.  With all the necessary water lines that run throughout a hospital a leak or flood is truly inevitable, but how the hospital handles the cleanup and restoration is what is really important.  If the flood happens in a surgical suite then there could be major issues.  The surgical suites are supposed to be completely sterile environments water pouring in from a broken pipe poses a serious problem.

 

There have been cases of patients that have gone into the hospital for minor surgery and because the hospital didn’t follow proper cleaning procedures, mold got into the patient’s body and caused them to go blind.  There is no excuse for putting a patient at risk in that way.  There are many different governing bodies that will put in detail the necessary steps to having a sterile environment.  OSHA has many standards regarding how to clean up after a flood or disaster event.  There is also the Institute of Inspection Cleaning and Restoration Certification (IICRC).  The IICRC along with the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) wrote S500 a Standard and Reference Guide for Professional Water Damage Restoration.

 

When hospitals experience a flood or disaster the intensity is elevated due to the number of people at immediate risk.  Industry professionals that monitor oversee restoration, and sample the disaster area are aware of all the standards to return a hospital to working order.  Click here to find firms that can help restore the hospital to the level of cleanliness needed to care for the sick.  It would be a tragedy to know that a patient got a fungal or mold infection due to poor reaction to a water leak.

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About Article Author

Leighanna Cumbie
Leighanna Cumbie

I just moved from Chicago to Tulsa, Oklahoma.  I have two dogs and am a car enthusiast. Safety in today's work environment is a passion of mine.  

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