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Several Factors Affecting the Effect of Enzyme Preparation

Enzyme preparations have penetrated into all aspects of our lives due to their high efficiency, safety, non-toxic side effects and low environmental impact. For example, the bread to eat, the juice and beverage we drink, the seasoning for cooking, and the paper documents we use can all use enzyme preparations.

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Probiotics and Breastfeeding

Once upon a time, breast milk was considered the best food for babies. Until now, many people still believe in this. However, even the most perfect food in nature can be contaminated by earth's ecology destroyed by humans. The pollution and destruction of the ecological environment and the lifestyles of modern society have caused many women to reduce their milk production, while the quality of milk is also declining. This situation is particularly evident in large cities and heavily polluted areas.

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Relationships Between Probiotics and Cancer

Cancer, or malignant tumor, has become one of the most common fatal diseases. There are about 11 million new cancer cases in the world every year, and new cancer cases in China account for 20.3% each year. It has always been a major public enemy threatening health. The occurrence of cancer is closely related to factors such as genetics, environmental pollution, bad habits, dietary nutrition, viral infections, and radiation.

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The Difference Between Probiotics and Digestive Enzymes

There are as many as four to five hundred kinds of bacteria in the human intestine, some of which secrete antibiotic-like substances to combat harmful bacteria such as Salmonella, Escherichia coli, candida Albicans, and Clostridium perfringens.

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The Relationship Between Probiotics and Human Health

At present, people have a deep understanding of the importance of macro-ecological balance, but micro-ecological balance is far from receiving the attention it deserves. Understanding the importance of the micro-ecological balance of the human body and maintaining the micro-ecological balance can enable human beings to adapt to the large environment externally, adapt to the micro-environment internally, and maintain the unity of the environment.

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Detailed Introduction to Probiotics and Prebiotics

It is generally believed that prebiotics provides "food" to probiotics, which can be decomposed and absorbed by beneficial bacteria in the intestines, and promote the growth and reproduction of beneficial bacteria. The familiar bifidus factor is prebiotic that promotes the growth of bifidobacteria in the intestine.

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Probiotics and Gynecology Health Care

There are more than 50 kinds of microorganisms (including aerobic bacteria and anaerobic bacteria) living in the vagina of healthy women, and it is also a microbial ecology. Aerobic bacteria include vaginal bacillus (dominant), corynebacterium, non-hemolytic streptococcus, enterococcus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Escherichia coli and Gardnerella.

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Detailed Introduction to Probiotics and gut health

The gastrointestinal tract represents the most extensive interface between the human organism and the external environment. The human gastrointestinal tract is settled by a complex microbial ecosystem, in which microbiota, nutrient and host cells interact extensively.

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Lipase in the Fields of Catalytic Synthesis and Food Processing

Enzymes have unparalleled advantages over ordinary catalysts and have been widely used in food, medicine, textile, detergent, and cosmetics industries. Most of these applications are performed in aqueous solution, but many valuable products are insoluble in water, and there are many useful compounds that cannot be synthesized by ordinary chemical methods.

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Chemical Composition of Enzyme Molecules

The essence of most enzymes is protein, only a few enzymes are RNA, so this article only discusses enzymes composed of proteins. These enzymes, like other proteins, are composed of amino acids and have primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary structures.

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Detailed Introduction to Protease

One of the main functions of proteases is to process proteins. Proteins in the body are difficult to digest and do not contain enzymes. Other types of proteases are involved in regulating the activities of blood-clotting cells. These enzymes are also called proteolytic enzymes.

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Introduction to Catalytic Characteristics of Enzymes

As biocatalysts, enzymes and general catalysts are the same in many respects. For example, the amount is small but the catalytic efficiency is high. Like general catalysts, enzymes can only change the speed of chemical reactions, not the equilibrium point of chemical reactions.

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Structured Views of Enzymes and EC numbers

Various of biochemical reactions continue to occur in organisms, which require corresponding enzymes to catalyze, so there are many types of enzymes. According to statistics from the enzyme website BRENDA, the number of enzymes officially included has reached 7,984.

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What Are Enzymes and How Do They Work?

High school textbooks say that most enzymes are proteins. This sentence is not comprehensive, and you can't know this fact just by deduction—enzymes are not only proteins but also RNases.

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Detailed Introduction to Pepsin

Pepsin is one of the main protein degradation or proteolytic enzymes in the digestive system. During the digestion process, pepsin acts on complex dietary proteins and is broken down into peptides and amino acids that are easily absorbed by the intestinal wall. It can be used as an adjuvant treatment for anemia, especially in weight loss diets when protein intake increases. It is used as a research tool for protein analysis. It can also be used in tablets to increase appetite and to prepare cheese and other protein-containing foods.

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