Free Articles, Free Web Content, Reprint Articles
Monday, November 20, 2017
 
Free Articles, Free Web Content, Reprint ArticlesRegisterAll CategoriesTop AuthorsSubmit Article (Article Submission)ContactSubscribe Free Articles, Free Web Content, Reprint Articles
 

Developing the Hazard Communication Standard

OSHA has developed the Hazard Communication Standard (HCS) as a way to provide information about chemicals that could be hazardous.  This standard has recently had heavy revisions to adopt a new international standard known as the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals (GHS).  The update replaces the previous standard which had the last major update in 1994.  

OSHA has developed the Hazard Communication Standard (HCS) as a way to provide information about chemicals that could be hazardous.  This standard has recently had heavy revisions to adopt a new international standard known as the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals (GHS).  The update replaces the previous standard which had the last major update in 1994. 

 

The information about the hazardous chemicals is designed to effectively communicate the dangers to workers and provide the needed training to prepare for daily interactions.  Companies that produce hazardous chemicals must assess the dangers that exist and provide information on those dangers through labels on the shipped containers and detailed information on Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS).  The labels on the containers provide an overview of the dangers the workers face.  The detailed sheets have more specific information to list out in detail those dangers.  The workers must have the proper training to be able to effectively recognize the warning labels on the containers, as well as be able to read the MSDS as needed.

 

The new standard revised the way MSDS are put together.  The previous standard required information to be provided, but did not set an order in which the material was to be presented.  This led to chemical manufacturers varying the order in which the material appeared.  The new GHS system requires the order to be the same.  This small adjustment saves time when an employee is searching for needed information.

 

The labels on the chemicals could also vary between different manufactures of the same chemical.  One container may say ‘very flammable’, while another said ‘highly flammable’.  The difference might be small; however it could lead to confusion for the worker utilizing the chemical.  The new GHS standard keeps the warning labels the same on the same chemical from different manufacturers.  The chemicals have a set classification and the labels have a similar appearance of size, shapeFind Article, and colors utilized to allow for quick identification.

 

Workers have the right to know what hazards they face and have the ability to recognize the dangers of each chemical they come into contact with.  Companies have a duty to help protect the employees by providing adequate training and equipment to keep the employees safe.  Click here to contact a Certified Industrial Hygienist to work with your company on adopting the new GHS standard.  OSHA mandates the GHS must be utilized moving forward and it is important to adopt the system to avoid unnecessary fines for violations.

Source: Free Articles from ArticlesFactory.com

ABOUT THE AUTHOR


I just moved from Chicago to Tulsa, Oklahoma.  I have two dogs and am a car enthusiast. Safety in today's work environment is a passion of mine.  



Health
Business
Finance
Travel
Technology
Home Repair
Computers
Marketing
Autos
Family
Entertainment
Education
Law
Communication
Other
Sports
ECommerce
Home Business
Self Help
Internet
Partners


Page loaded in 0.992 seconds