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Your First Days On the New Job

Workers who are just starting a new job after ... ... will be ... and tense, less secure and ... than the the salad days of job ... This is normal, to be ...

Workers who are just starting a new job after surviving unemployment will be shell-shocked and tense, less secure and confident than the the salad days of job security. This is normal, to be expected.

What should you do, and avoid doing, to make a great start? Here are my recommendations, derived from many discussions with employers and employees. You should take these very seriously, breaking one or more in the first few days can create a negative impression that you'll spend a long time living down!

FIRST DAYS ON THE NEW JOB -15 WAYS TO REDUCE PERSONAL STRESS AND IMPRESS YOUR BOSS:

(1) Dress for Success. Even if "business casual" is the rule, dress a little better until you've "felt your way" and know people.

(2) Be On Time. Be on time. Be on time. Did I mention...?

(3) Warmly greet your new boss and co-workers. A sincere smile and honest appreciation is like the oil that keeps the wheels of and organization spinning smoothly. You will stand out from the crowd.

(4) Expect a learning curve. Plan for it, plan to get extra rest in the evenings.

(5) Request an orientation (to insure that you are in alignment with the goals of your boss and company).

(6) Request homework (there could be reams of information for you to review and process that may will help you "hit the ground running," but there may not be enough hours in the day for you to digest.

(7) Be prepared to invest more than required (in terms of time and effort).

(8) Don't be afraid to ask for help (it will save time in the long run).

(9) Live by a "TO DO list" and have it approved by your boss.

(10) Don't gossip...Word will get out quickly.

(11) Allow plenty of time to learn the corporate culture.

(12) Listen more...talk less. You don't learn much when you're talking.

(13) Don't be afraid to go the "extra mile" for both your boss and co-workers. (It's a worthwhile investment in your future).

(14) "Be the answer" to your companies needs. You would not have been hired if there were not a problem to be solved or opportunities. Find the problem, fill the need and "be the answer."

(15) Be a team player. Always make your boss look good. Never reveal new information in a meeting...Let your boss. Don't be afraid to give credit to him or her or fellow workmates.

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E-Zine publishers: You are free to reprint this article so long as you include the following credit, including the web site:
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J. Damian Birkel is the founder of Professionals in Transition® Support Groups and the author of "Career Bounce-Back!" He's been through the crucible of downsizing twice, and today helps others get through the crisis to reemployment. He is one of the most widely quoted experts on the emotional impact of unemployment, and has been featured by CNN, NPR, The Wall Street Journal, Fortune Magazine, The New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, and many other news outlets.

You can get the entire REEMPLOYMENT TOOLBOX, which includes Birkel's book "Career Bounce-Back!", "The Career Bounce-Back! Workbook"Free Web Content, and Birkel's workshop video "Surfing the Emotional Wave of Unemployment" at www.careerbounceback.com.

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR


J. Damian Birkel is the founder of Professionals in Transition® Support Groups. He has been through the crucible of downsizing twice, and now helps others survive the ordeal. He has been featured on CNN, CNN-FN, NPR, and in Time, Fortune, The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, and other prestigious publications.



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