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Top Words and Phrases You Should Not Use in a Cover Letter

A cover letter is your introduction to recruiters, and as such needs to be perfect so that you make a good impression. The words and phrases that you use make a big difference in how you are perceived, so it is important to use the right ones. It is also important to remember that the recruiter will be reading it in his own voice and you do not have the benefit of expression. Here is our run-down of the top words and phrases to avoid in a cover letter.

A cover letter is your introduction to recruiters, and as such needs to be perfect so that you make a good impression. The words and phrases that you use make a big difference in how you are perceived, so it is important to use the right ones. It is also important to remember that the recruiter will be reading it in his own voice and you do not have the benefit of expression. Here is our run-down of the top words and phrases to avoid in a cover letter.

To whom it may concern - Social media and ease of access to information on the Internet means that you can find the correct person to address by name. Not doing so shows that you are lazy and possess a lack of motivation, and this will put you at a disadvantage to candidates who do take the time to find the right person. Accordingly, you are less likely to get an interview if you demonstrate a lack of motivation.

References available upon request - Recruiters would expect you to have references lined up already, therefore rendering this a meaningless statement. Although you do not have to put those references down on the cover letter, if you choose not to do so, then do not mention at all.

I need a chance - Although you may not use this exact phrase, recruiters can tell when someone is forlorn or rejected. Recruiters want to see positivity; not that you feel victimised by a lack of workplace success. If you come across as negative or lacking the ability to do the job then you will not get an interview.

Salary expectations - Mentioning salary at this point is presumptuous and rude. When you write a cover letter you have not obtained an interview, let alone been offered the job, and mentioning salary is likely to annoy the recruiter. Salary is likely to be mentioned in the job advert and cannot be negotiated in a cover letter. If it is not listed in the advert then wait until the interview to see if it is discussed.

Hope - This is a common word in sentences such as “I hope to hear from you soon” or “hope to contribute my skills”, but it will not be doing you any favours. Hope leaves the chance of rejection open and you want to ensure that the recruiter does not get that sense. Instead say “I look forward to hearing from you” or “I have the correct skill set to benefit your company.”

Hone - Many CVs state “I honed my skills in communication in my last position,” but you want to stand out from everybody else. Do this by simply stating what you did and employers will then realise that you honed your skills; if you want to elaborate further use such words as “sharpened” or “developed”.

Drawn - Companies do not want to hear that you were drawn to them; it is not a romantic relationship and is therefore a useless statement. Instead explain in full why you want to work there, for example “the skills I developed in management during my five years with ABC are a match for the role I would like to apply for with you today.”

Feel - Many people say something like “I feel that I would be a good match because”, and this is a mistake. The reason this is a mistake is because the company does not want to know how you feel, it wants to know what you can do for it; thereforeFree Web Content, say “my unique skill set makes me an ideal candidate for the role on offer to work at your company.”

Source: Free Articles from ArticlesFactory.com

ABOUT THE AUTHOR


Sarah Jacob is editor in chief at EmptyLemon, one of the UK's leading IT jobs boards.



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