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Earning An FAA License Starts With An FAA Approved Flight Training Program

What should an aspiring commercial pilot look for in a flight training program? Start with an FAA certified school offering FAA courses and you’re more likely to meet your career objectives.

It’s easy to see why working as commercial pilot is appealing to so many –†the thrill of flight, travel, strong potential earnings, appealing work schedules. If a career in aviation is on your radar, start with the right training, for fixed wing or helicopter training.

There are two types of flight schools recognized by the Federal Aviation Administration, or FAA, Part 61 and Part 141. These identifiers refer to the parts of the Federal Aviation Regulations (FARs) under which they operate.

For Part 141, FAA approved fixed wing and helicopter pilot schools are certificated in accordance with†Title 14, Code of Federal Regulations part 141.

According to the FAA website,“Enrollment in an FAA-approved pilot school usually ensures a high quality of training.

In order to receive FAA approval, a school must meet prescribed standards with respect to equipment, facilities, personnel, and curricula. Part 141 schools are periodically audited by the FAA and must have detailed, FAA-approved course outlines and meet student fixed wing and helicopter pilot performance rates.

According to the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association (AOPA), the most important distinction between the two programs is structured and accountability. Part 141 schools are periodically audited by the FAA and must have detailed, FAA-approved course outlines and meet student pilot performance rates. Part 61 schools don't have the same paperwork and accountability requirements.

Upon successful completion of their training program and logging adequate flight hours – 250 for fixed wing, 210 for rotor –pilots must pass a series of FAA practical tests.

Student pilots enrolled in FAA designated flight programs are preparing to test for FAA certifications and ratings, including FAA141 Private Pilot License, FAA141 Instrument Rating, FAA141 Commercial Pilot License, FAA141 Certified Flight Instructor Rating.

To work in commercial aviation, pilots will need additional flight experience and may need a college degree, as well. It’s not a quick trip to a career in the skiesFree Reprint Articles, but it can be a very rewarding one for those who prepare well.

Source: Free Articles from ArticlesFactory.com

ABOUT THE AUTHOR


Justin Plentier writes about aviation trends and careers. His interest in helicopter training was peaked about five years ago during a scenic helicopter tour of Oahu during a family vacation. He spends a few weeks each year touring and reviewing fixed wing and helicopter pilot programs throughout the United States.



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