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Why Having Information on Contribution Limits Will Aid to Maximize Your Roth IRA

Understanding your Roth IRA contribution limits is critical to maximizing your tax savings and benefits potential. It's also important to be able to prepare in advance.

For those who can afford to put away money in their retirement and savings account, the biggest question is how much to put in. To do so, you need to understand your limits, like the Roth IRA contribution limits and other tax limitations. Unfortunately, most people don't figure these out until it's tax crunch time and their scrambling to sock away some retirement savings. 

That's why it's critical to keep track of Roth IRA contribution limits and other pension saving restrictions on an ongoing basis. That way you can plan ahead and make sure you have the funds on hand to maximize your savings and tax breaks. But, how do you do that, and what are those limitations? Keep reading to find out. 

401K Contributions and Limits

Though not directly related to a Roth IRA, your 401(k) is interconnected. Two years ago, the U.S. government made a temporary law that allowed higher 401(k) contributions a permanent statute. Now, you can contribute up to $15,500 per year, and people over the age of 50 can play catch up by adding an additional $5000 annually.

Limits on Roth IRA Contributions

Roth IRA contributions sit at a low limit of $5000 for those under the age of 50. That equals out to almost $417 each month. But, if you're 50 and older, you can defer $6000 to your IRA. Those limits are set to increase annually in $500 increments, based on current inflation rates.

If you're currently part of a work-based plan for your IRA and want to convert those to a Roth IRA, there are other constraints in place that could wreak havoc on your plans.

Essentially, if your Modified Adjusted Gross Income is between $95,000 and $110,000 or higher for a single person or $150,000 - $160,000 or higher for a married person, you may no longer be able to deduct contributions to work IRA plans.

SIMPLE IRAs

SIMPLE IRAs are funded both by voluntary salary deductions and employer contributions. Employees, if eligible, can contribute up to 100% of their yearly salary or $11,000, whichever of the two amounts is less. If you're 51 or over, you can make additional annual contributions of up to $2500 - bringing your annual limit to $13,500.

Roth IRA Catch-Up Plans and Limits

Anyone who is over the age of 50 and currently participating in a Roth IRA, traditional IRA, 403b plan or 401k plan, is allowed to make catch-up payments or contributions up to $5000 per calendar year, with that number increasing each year for inflation.

Remember, before you invest and start saving for your retirement, make sure you understand your limitations, including your Roth IRA contribution limitsFree Articles, so you can best maximize your tax benefits.  

Source: Free Articles from ArticlesFactory.com

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