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Angiokeratomas and Their Effect on Men's Health

Of all the aspects of menís health, concerns over menís sexual health will usually be more dominant than others. One area that could affect a manís sexual performance but more likely his social life...

Of all the aspects of menís health, concerns over menís sexual health will usually be more dominant than others.

One area that could affect a manís sexual performance but more likely his social life is the development of small purplish spots, or angiokeratomas, on the scrotum. There are several different types of angiokeratoma: sporadic angiokeratoma, angiokeratoma of Fordyce, angiokeratoma circumscriptum, and Fabry syndrome. The angiokeratoma more commonly associated with the common small scrotal blood blisters is angiokeratoma of Fordyce.

These spots, or lesions are asymptomatic, that is to say, benign vascular malformations. In angiokeratoma of Fordyce, the small, dark red to purple lesions result from dilated capillaries with weakened vessel walls. The blood pressure in the capillary pushes against the weakened wall forcing it to the surface of the skin. Sometimes a blood clot, or thrombosis, may form in the weakened area and the color of the lesion will change from dark red to black in a short time. The blood clot may resemble a malignancy through coloration but is, in fact, harmless.

These markings are more commonly found on men above the age of 40, but have been found in boys and men of all ages. The spots are smaller with younger men, but become larger, darker, and have an overlying scaly appearance (hyperkeratosis) in older men. These lesions are harmless and oftentimes not noticed until ruptured due to sexual intercourse or through scratching in the area.

There is no medical treatment needed for angiokeratomas. Since, in appearance, they may resemble a melanoma, sometimes a biopsy will be performed to solidify the diagnosis of an angiokeratoma.

Even though there are no adverse symptoms associated with having angiokeratomas regarding mens sexual health, men may still feel hindered in sexual performance and face embarrassment when revealing the condition to a lover or even a physician. As a result, cosmetic treatments can be performed to remove or lessen the appearance of the scrotum blood blisters. These treatments include: various forms of ablation using either an argon laser, or through cryotherapy, and by physically excising the lesions.

In laser therapy, an argon laser beam is used as a hemostyptic and to flatten out the vascular malformation. Cryotherapy is also used as a cosmetic treatment and is usually more cost effective. Physicians performing cryotherapy use liquid nitrogen and apply it to the spots. The treatment area may blister slightly before forming a scab. The scab eventually dries up and falls away leaving the area free of spotting. Oftentimes after using cryotherapy, a white mark will appear due to hypopigmentation whereas with laser therapy, no scarring or marking usually occurs after treatment.

In order to have these procedures completed, men need to confront the embarrassment and concern over the appearance of scrotum blood blisters and consult a dermatologist or urologist.
Sexual activity does not need to be limited when angiokeratoma are present. A man should discuss with his partner that the presence of the spots may cause slight bleeding after intercourse, but is not contagious in any way and will not harm the partner adversely.

Men should always be concerned with all aspects of their health, not only conditions related to mens sexual health. Fear and embarrassment over angiokeratoma lesions can only lead to undue stress and anxiety. The condition is harmless, though can be inconvenient at times, but treatments exist to remove the spots for cosmesis if desired and should be discussed with a trustworthy doctor.

Angiokeratomas and Their Effect on Men's Health

Of all the aspects of menís health, concerns over menís sexual health will usually be more dominant than others.

One area that could affect a manís sexual performance but more likely his social life is the development of small purplish spots, or angiokeratomas, on the scrotum. There are several different types of angiokeratoma: sporadic angiokeratoma, angiokeratoma of Fordyce, angiokeratoma circumscriptum, and Fabry syndrome. The angiokeratoma more commonly associated with the common small scrotal blood blisters is angiokeratoma of Fordyce.

These spots, or lesions are asymptomatic, that is to say, benign vascular malformations. In angiokeratoma of Fordyce, the small, dark red to purple lesions result from dilated capillaries with weakened vessel walls. The blood pressure in the capillary pushes against the weakened wall forcing it to the surface of the skin. Sometimes a blood clot, or thrombosis, may form in the weakened area and the color of the lesion will change from dark red to black in a short time. The blood clot may resemble a malignancy through coloration but is, in fact, harmless.

These markings are more commonly found on men above the age of 40, but have been found in boys and men of all ages. The spots are smaller with younger men, but become larger, darker, and have an overlying scaly appearance (hyperkeratosis) in older men. These lesions are harmless and oftentimes not noticed until ruptured due to sexual intercourse or through scratching in the area.

There is no medical treatment needed for angiokeratomas. Since, in appearance, they may resemble a melanoma, sometimes a biopsy will be performed to solidify the diagnosis of an angiokeratoma.

Even though there are no adverse symptoms associated with having angiokeratomas regarding mens sexual health, men may still feel hindered in sexual performance and face embarrassment when revealing the condition to a lover or even a physician. As a result, cosmetic treatments can be performed to remove or lessen the appearance of the scrotum blood blisters. These treatments include: various forms of ablation using either an argon laser, or through cryotherapy, and by physically excising the lesions.

In laser therapy, an argon laser beam is used as a hemostyptic and to flatten out the vascular malformation. Cryotherapy is also used as a cosmetic treatment and is usually more cost effective. Physicians performing cryotherapy use liquid nitrogen and apply it to the spots. The treatment area may blister slightly before forming a scab. The scab eventually dries up and falls away leaving the area free of spotting. Oftentimes after using cryotherapy, a white mark will appear due to hypopigmentation whereas with laser therapy, no scarring or marking usually occurs after treatment.

In order to have these procedures completed, men need to confront the embarrassment and concern over the appearance of scrotum blood blisters and consult a dermatologist or urologist.
Sexual activity does not need to be limited when angiokeratoma are present. A man should discuss with his partner that the presence of the spots may cause slight bleeding after intercourse, but is not contagious in any way and will not harm the partner adversely.

Men should always be concerned with all aspects of their health, not only conditions related to mens sexual health. Fear and embarrassment over angiokeratoma lesions can only lead to undue stress and anxiety. The condition is harmless, though can be inconvenient at times, but treatments exist to remove the spots for cosmesis if desired and should be discussed with a trustworthy doctor.

Mens sexual health issues explainedFeature Articles, click here now; Blisters be Gone

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