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5 Things You Didn't Know About A Boxer Dog

Before purchasing a Boxer--or any dog--you should consider various aspects to decide if this is the right breed for you. The worse thing you can do as a dog owner is not research the potential dog. If...

Before purchasing a Boxer--or any dog--you should consider various aspects to decide if this is the right breed for you. The worse thing you can do as a dog owner is not research the potential dog. If you don't, you may find yourself surprised, or overwhelmed and unable to work with the breed. Boxers have their own set of challenges so it is important to understand them.

One: grooming. With its short coat, the Boxer is an extremely easy breed to groom. This is a low maintenance dog that only requires a quick brushing every day; bathing need only occur when necessary. Also, Boxers are fastidious creatures that will clean themselves, like cats. For those looking for an easy to care for pet, the Boxer ranks high.

Two: exercise. The Boxer is an active breed so those looking for just a house dog should reconsider. Though this dog will want to be in the house with you, it will want plenty of time outdoors for play. Boxers, being very energetic, respond well to structured ctivities like games of fetch or frisbee. They do not do well by just lying around the house. If you are not able to spend the time with them, this is not the breed for you.

Three: health concerns. Larger dogs always have certain health risks and the Boxer is no different. This breed runs the chance of: cardiomyopathy, sub-aortic stenosis or hip dysphasia. Also, after the age of eight, this breed is more likely to develop tumors than other dogs. This is why you must buy your Boxer from an experienced breeder. With these potential risks, all dogs must be properly screened, and regular trips to the Vet should be planned.

Four: temperament. The Boxer's temperament is both its greatest advantage and its potential downfall. This is a highly playful, spirited dog that becomes greatly attached to its owners. This is also a dog that suffers from mischievous instincts (such as the need to chew) and separation anxiety. When you own a Boxer, be prepared to find a devoted, though sometimes stubborn, breed that will want to go everywhere with you.

Five: protection. Many assume that, because of the Boxer's sturdy frame, it makes an excellent protector. This is both correct and not so. The Boxer is, generally, a friendly pet that will welcome strangers. But, if it feels its family is threatened, it will take down an intruder. What you must take note of is: some areas require that you register larger breeds, like Boxers, and will charge money for their presence. While you can use a Boxer as protectionFree Articles, you must be careful--many cities will fine you for any suspected offense.

Source: Free Articles from ArticlesFactory.com

ABOUT THE AUTHOR


Richard Cussons is a champion for dogs of all breeds but Boxers in particular. You can find out more about Boxer dogs at the Boxer Savvy web site.



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