Free Articles, Free Web Content, Reprint Articles
Saturday, June 15, 2019
 
Free Articles, Free Web Content, Reprint ArticlesRegisterAll CategoriesTop AuthorsSubmit Article (Article Submission)ContactSubscribe Free Articles, Free Web Content, Reprint Articles
 

Anti-aircraft artillery

It is almost impossible to score a direct hit on a high-flying airplane. The shells fired from anti-aircraft guns are set to explode near the enemy aircraft. In this way the fragments or pieces of the exploded shells will hit the enemy aircraft. The newest type of anti-aircraft weapon is not a gun but a rocket.

It is almost impossible to score a direct hit on a high-flying airplane. The shells fired from anti-aircraft guns are set to explode near the enemy aircraft. In this way the fragments or pieces of the exploded shells will hit the enemy aircraft. The newest type of anti-aircraft weapon is not a gun but a rocket. A rocket is fired from the ground and controlled in its flight by radio. It is called a guided missile, because the radio or radar guides it to its target—the enemy aircraft. Anti-aircraft guns are placed all around a place that must be defended against air attack. They are grouped in batteries. A battery usually consists of four guns. As many as five hundred guns were fired at one time in defending cities during World War II.

Enemy bombers were often forced to fly through a thick hail of exploding shells. The airmen in World War II used two nicknames for anti-aircraft fire. The first name, "flak," came from the German word for antiaircraft. The second name, "ack-ack," came from the initials of anti-aircraftFree Web Content, and also the noise made by the firing of the guns.


Source: Free Articles from ArticlesFactory.com

ABOUT THE AUTHOR




Health
Business
Finance
Travel
Technology
Home Repair
Computers
Marketing
Autos
Family
Entertainment
Law
Education
Communication
Other
Sports
ECommerce
Home Business
Self Help
Internet
Partners


Page loaded in 0.017 seconds