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Safety Programs and Poisonous Plants

Safety Plans typically have hazards that are often encountered while working inside a facility, but dangers are also out in nature.  A comprehensive Safety Plan should contain hazards that an employee might face on a day to day bases.  The safety plan may also include exposure to toxic plants, venomous snakes, and stinging insects. 

Safety Plans typically have hazards that are often encountered while working inside a facility, but dangers are also out in nature.  A comprehensive Safety Plan should contain hazards that an employee might face on a day to day bases.  The safety plan may also include exposure to toxic plants, venomous snakes, and stinging insects. 

 

The severity of the encountered hazard could range from mild discomfort to an emergency room visit.  Poisonous plants such as poison oak, poison ivy, stinging nettle, poison sumac, and poison hemlock are some of the most commonly encountered poisonous plants.  Workers should be able to identify the toxic plant to avoid brushing the plant or contacting contaminated clothing.

 

A proper safety plan will give employees the necessary knowledge and skills to safely work around these plants.  Protective Clothing should be worn when working near poisonous plants.  The clothing might include pants, gloves, hats, and long sleeve shirts.  In some instances facemasks could be required to reduce pollen and dust encountered by exposed workers.  One important step is to not burn the toxic plants.  The fumes would be very dangerous if inhaled and typically result in a hospital visit.

 

Any item that is or might be contaminated should be washed thoroughly.  Poison ivy, for example, remains on a surface for weeks.  Any equipment would be contaminated for a long time and it is important to treat anything that might have come into contact with poison ivy like it was contaminated.  A small piece of debris could roll around and contaminate everything it touches. 

 

Once exposed to a poisonous plant, typically a red rash is developed within a couple of days after contact.  The rash is compounded with bumps and blisters that start to form.  The area begins to swell and becomes itchy.  Treatment includes dousing the exposed area with rubbing alcohol or a dishwashing soap (degreaser) while using plenty of water.  The area should be scrubbed and areas such as under fingernails.  Calamine lotion can be used along with other things.  Any antihistamines will aid in the reduction of swelling, but should not be used while operating heavy machinery.

 

A Safety Profession would be able to help identify potential hazards that employees encounter indoors and outdoorsScience Articles, and include those element s into a safety plan.  The employees should be aware of each hazard they may come in contact with and educated of how to properly address that hazard.  A Safety Professional will ensure each hazard is addressed. Click here to contact a Safety Professional to work with your company on creating a comprehensive safety plan.

Source: Free Articles from ArticlesFactory.com

ABOUT THE AUTHOR


I just moved from Chicago to Tulsa, Oklahoma.  I have two dogs and am a car enthusiast. Safety in today's work environment is a passion of mine.  



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