Raising Chickens at Home For Eggs - Know the Basics

Sep 21 09:34 2009 Charlotte Winslow Print This Article

Raising chickens at home is one of the most rewarding experiences I have ever had.  The excitement of selecting the cute little baby peeps that will one day provide you with nutritious eggs is contagious.  Before you know it the whole family will be in on it.

Raising chickens at home is one of the most rewarding experiences I have ever had. The excitement of selecting the cute little baby peeps that will one day provide you with nutritious eggs is contagious. Before you know it the whole family will be in on it.

When first starting out you should decide if you want to raise the chickens as peeps or try to find older hens for your flock. It is sometimes possible to buy five-month old pullet hens that will lay eggs shortly,Guest Posting but more than likely, you'll have to raise your own baby peeps. If raising baby chicks, it will take a 5-6 month growing period before you get any eggs.

Leghorn chickens lay white eggs. Breeds such as Rhode Island Reds, Barred Rocks or New Hampshire's lay brown eggs. Some say there's no difference in taste, but I, personally, like brown eggs better.

In your small flock, 10 hens should lay between 8-9 dozen eggs daily once they get going. Bad weather, darker days, frozen water and no feed will affect egg production adversely.

As hens grown older they will slowly lay fewer eggs. A flock of 10 hens will slow up to about 6-7 eggs daily after a little longer than a year of egg production. During that time each hen should produce 20 dozen or so eggs and eat almost 100 pounds of chicken feed.

Chickens do very well indoors. A fenced in run would be beneficial for the birds so they can get outdoors during weather. Your birds, however, should not be allowed to roam freely or they may start laying their eggs under buildings, in the brush, or anywhere in the yard. You don't want to have an Easter Egg Hunt in the middle of summer!

Hens require light to lay eggs. Provide at least 14 hours of total light daily from September through May. If you don't have a timer, let the light on throughout the night. Ensuring adequate light exposure will keep your hens laying eggs during the shorter days of the year.

Laying hens can sometimes start pecking each other or their eggs. This usually occurs if the birds are stressed, bored, crowded or hot. Sometimes lights that are too bright can bring on the pecking as well.
Be sure they have adequate space and ventilation. Darkening the room a bit may help also.

Healthy egg laying hens should eat and drink regularly. Your chickens should stand with their heads tall and tails elevated. Their overall appearance should be clean and bright. The beaks, combs, and wattles of egg-laying hens should be pale in color.

Once in a while you may lose a bird for no apparent reason. Call your vet if any other birds start to look ill. You may have a disease in your flock.

Before beginning your chicken raising adventure, though, be sure to check your local zoning and building ordinances. Laws and ordinances in some communities may restrict or ban the raising of poultry or livestock in your area.

With proper care your egg-producing hens should provide you with quality eggs for the foreseeable future. Take good care of them and they will always provide for you.

Source: Free Guest Posting Articles from ArticlesFactory.com

  Article "tagged" as:
  Categories:

About Article Author

Charlotte Winslow
Charlotte Winslow

Charlotte Winslow knows the fun of raising chickens at home for eggs. She also knows that the more informed you are, the better chance you have at succeeding in your chicken venture. At http://raisingchickensathome.info you'll find everything you need to know in order to get started right away.

View More Articles