How to Remove Grape Juice from Upholstery

May 15 07:46 2012 Adrian Fisher Print This Article

Grape juice is a healthy drink with all the vitamins it contains, but it makes sticky, unsightly stains when it has been spilled. If someone spills grape juice on your upholstered furniture, the best thing you can do is to tackle the stain immediately.

Grape juice is a healthy drink with all the vitamins it contains,Guest Posting but it makes sticky, unsightly stains when it has been spilled. If someone spills grape juice on your upholstered furniture, the best thing you can do is to tackle the stain immediately. Since grape juice tends to seep quickly into fabrics, treating the stain as soon as possible will prevent the juice from soaking deep into the upholstery. Also a set-in stain will be much more difficult to remove than fresh one. So, instead of making your job harder than it is, follow these simple and effective tips to remove grape juice from upholstery quickly and easily.
Instructions

  1. Place a thick layer of paper towels over the area affected by grape juice and press them down with hands to absorb as much of the spilled juice as possible. Change to clean paper towels and continue to soak up grape juice until no more of it comes out of the upholstery, as advised by cleaners Paddington.
  2. Pour 1 tablespoon of white vinegar and 2/3 cup of rubbing alcohol in a small bowl. Use a spoon to stir the mixture thoroughly.
  3. Dip a clean cloth in the cleaning solution, squeeze out the excess moisture and dab at the stained area to moisten the stain.
  4. Press a dry cloth against the affected area to lift the cleaning solution and the stain from the upholstery.  Apply more of the vinegar and rubbing alcohol mixture if needed and blot dry again. Repeat until the grape juice stain has been completely removed.
  5. Use a cloth dampened in plain water to rinse the upholstered furniture, then immediately blot the surface dry with a dry cloth.
  6. Let the upholstery air dry completely.
Note: Test the cleaning solution on an inconspicuous area of your upholstery, as recommended by cleaners Paddington, to make sure it won't cause any damage to the fabric.

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About Article Author

Adrian Fisher
Adrian Fisher

Adrian Fisher is a London-based freelance journalist with a mission to make you a better, cleaner, happier human being. He enjoys writing articles about the obscure facets of modern life.

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