NTSB Aviation Reporting Requirements - When and What to Report

Apr 6 17:54 2006 Grant Wallace Print This Article

First we must examine how the aircraft involved are categorized by the NTSB. The NTSB recognizes four major groups of aircraft for reporting purposes. These groups are as follows

When must we file a report to the NTSB?
First we must examine how the aircraft involved are categorized by the NTSB. The NTSB recognizes four major groups of aircraft for reporting purposes. These groups are as follows:

Small Aircraft (Less than 12,Guest Posting500 lbs. MTOW)
Large Aircraft (More than 12,500 lbs. MTOW)
Public Aircraft (Not including Military or Intelligence Services)
Military (Armed Forces)
 
Right off the bat we can eliminate the last two. Public Aircraft and Armed Forces aircraft are not our concern. While there are reports filed for these aircraft groups, they are handled differently than our reports.
 
Does location matter?
United States certificated aircraft are required to file a report regardless of where the incident took place (I.e. Texas or India), and foreign certificated aircraft are required to file if the incident occurred in the United States, it's territories or possessions.
 
What is an Accident?
Now that we know which aircraft we are concerned with and the major details of the filing requirements we can explore the fine print. First and foremost if an aircraft is involved in an accident we must report. The definition of an aircraft accident is:

"an occurrence associated with the operation of an aircraft which takes place between the time any person boards the aircraft with the intention of flight and all such persons have disembarked, and in which any person suffers death or serious injury, or in which the aircraft receives substantial damage."
  
Now we all understand that if an aircraft is involved in an accident we should report, right? Not so fast, speedy. We need understand the terms used in the definition of the term "Accident". They are as follows:  
Fatal injury means any injury which results in death within 30 days of the accident.
Incident means an occurrence other than an accident, associated with the operation of an aircraft, which affects or could affect the safety of operations.
Serious injury means any injury which: (1) requires hospitalization for more than 48 hours, commencing within 7 days from the date the injury was received; (2) results in a fracture of any bone (except simple fractures of fingers, toes, or nose); (3) causes severe hemorrhages, nerve, muscle, or tendon damage; (4) involves any internal organ; or (5) involves second or third degree burns, or any burns affecting more than 5 percent of the body surface.
Substantial damage means damage or failure which adversely affects the structural strength, performance, or flight characteristics of the aircraft, and which would normally require major repair or replacement of the affected component. Engine failure or damage limited to an engine if only one engine fails or is damaged, bent fairings or cowling, dented skin, small punctured holes in the skin or fabric, ground damage to rotor or propeller blades, and damage to landing gear, wheels, tires, flaps, engine accessories, brakes, or wingtips are not considered substantial damage for the purpose of this part.
  
Now we can determine if we have been involved in an accident. That’s one down.   
   
When else do we report?   
Now we need to dissect our aircraft. Is it in category one ore two? The following applies to category one or two  
You must report if at any time "between the time any person boards the aircraft with the intention of flight and all such persons have disembarked" you experience any of the following:

Flight control system malfunction or failure;
Inability of any required flight crewmember to perform normal flight duties as a result of injury or illness;
Failure of structural components of a turbine engine excluding compressor and turbine blades and vanes;
In-flight fire; or
Aircraft collide in flight.
Damage to property, other than the aircraft, estimated to exceed $25,000 for repair (including materials and labor) or fair market value in the event of total loss, whichever is less. 
   
If your aircraft is certified with a MTOW of 12,500 lbs or greater (Category Two), then the additional reporting requirements are as follows:   
You must report if at any time "between the time any person boards the aircraft with the intention of flight and all such persons have disembarked" you experience any of the following:

In-flight failure of electrical systems which requires the sustained use of an emergency bus powered by a backup source such as a battery, auxiliary power unit, or air driven generator to retain flight control or essential instruments;
In-flight failure of hydraulic systems that results in sustained reliance on the sole remaining hydraulic or mechanical system for movement of flight control surfaces;
Sustained loss of the power or thrust produced by two or more engines; and
An evacuation of an aircraft in which an emergency egress system is utilized. 
   
Is there any other time I would need to report?   
Yes, one other time is, if an aircraft is overdue AND thought to be involved in an accident.   
   
This newsletter is not meant to be an exhaustive explanation of NTSB part 830, only a summary of the regulation. The NTSB does not categorize aircraft the way this newsletter does. The categorization in this newsletter was for illustration purposes only. For specific information on your particular situation please contact us directly or file a report to the NTSB if necessary.

Source: Free Guest Posting Articles from ArticlesFactory.com

About Article Author

Grant Wallace
Grant Wallace

Grant Wallace founded Analytical Aviation in January 2000. Since that time he has been working toward improving aviation maintenance through technology. He has been the driving force in his comapny's technology products. Mr. Wallace's experience is in aviation maintenance and he has been involved in aviation from a very young age. He has worked from simple line maintenance to part 121 maintenance and developed maintenance programs for regulated operations. He has also managed several corporate aircraft for different companies in the past. His military experience spans from large transport aircraft maintenance to small rotor wing maintenance. He has been a military aircrew member and he holds a degree in industrial engineering technology, a private pilot's certificate with an instrument rating and an A&P. Grant Wallace can be contacted at 1-888-484-4321.

View More Articles