A Look at 6 Types of Insulin and How They Work

Jul 7 18:55 2021 Reeta Menon Print This Article

If you are diabetic, you may use synthetically prepared insulin via intramuscular injections to help manage your blood sugar levels. However, with the different types of insulin that exist today, you may be confused about how they work and when they are administered. 

Insulin is a hormone secreted by your pancreas. Its main function is to prevent your blood sugar levels from increasing to dangerously high levels. In some people,Guest Posting insulin is either produced in lesser amounts or is not as effective in bringing down blood sugar levels. This results in diabetes.

If you are diabetic, you may use synthetically prepared insulin via intramuscular injections to help manage your blood sugar levels. However, with the different types of insulin that exist today, you may be confused about how they work and when they are administered. 

When Is Insulin Needed?

Insulin medication is provided to people with:

  • Type 1 Diabetes: This is a condition when the pancreas does not produce any insulin. It usually develops in childhood and is called juvenile diabetes.
  • Type 2 Diabetes: Here, the body does not make enough insulin, or the insulin is not effective anymore. 90% of all diabetes cases are diagnosed as type 2 diabetes, making it the most common form of the condition.
  • Gestational Diabetes: Your body may struggle to produce enough insulin to keep up with the changing hormone levels during pregnancy. This leads to gestational diabetes.

Types of Insulin

Keeping in mind different lifestyles, systemic conditions, age groups and other factors, your doctor will prescribe the right type of insulin for you. Let's understand more about the 6 different types of insulin and the time span of action for each one.

  1. Rapid-Acting Insulin

This insulin begins acting within 15 minutes of being injected into the body, and its action lasts for 2 to 4 hours. A rapid-acting insulin is usually administered right before a meal to prevent blood sugar levels from spiking. This type of insulin is often prescribed along with long-acting insulin.

  1. Regular Insulin

Regular insulin acts around 30 minutes after entering the body and lasts for 3 to 6 hours. It is also called short-acting insulin and can be injected long before mealtime as compared to rapid-acting insulin. This group of insulins is prescribed to prevent a spike in blood sugar levels after a meal.

  1. Intermediate-Acting Insulin

Intermediate-acting insulin is less commonly used and can work for around half a day. Its activity begins 1 to 2 hours after entering the body, and its effects can last for as long as 12 hours. This injectable is preferred for insulin coverage overnight. 

  1. Long-Acting Insulin

Long-acting insulins begin their effect 2 to 4 hours after entering the body and can work for 24 hours. In many cases, this insulin needs to be taken first thing in the morning. You may also need ultra-rapid or rapid-acting insulin to supplement its effects. 

  1. Ultra-Long-Acting Insulin

This group of insulins takes about 6 hours to begin its effect but lasts from 36 to 42 hours. That said, unlike long-acting insulin, ultra-long-acting insulins do not peak. This property reduces the chance of having a low blood sugar level at any time during the day.

  1. Inhaled Insulin

As the name suggests, this group of insulins is inhaled, and you will see its effects around 12 to 15 minutes of being inhaled. Their levels usually peak around 30 minutes after inhalation and can last up to 3 hours, after which they are eliminated from the body. These are often combined with long-acting insulin for a more sustained effect.

Intermediate-acting, long-acting and ultra-long-acting insulins are also called basal insulin. Their main goal is to maintain optimum blood glucose levels during an extended period of fasting, especially during sleep. This regimen of prescribing insulin mimics the body's natural release of the hormone. 

Apart from basal insulin, once daily, twice daily, sliding scale and insulin pump therapy may be advised. Your doctor will determine the insulin dosage after evaluating your health parameters.

In Closing

If you have diabetes, knowing which kind of insulin to use and calculating your doses is necessary to keep your blood sugar levels from spiking. Always consult your doctor before adjusting your insulin levels.

 

Source: Free Guest Posting Articles from ArticlesFactory.com

About Article Author

Reeta Menon
Reeta Menon

Reeta Menon

 

 

View More Articles