Graphology at Home - Lesson 2

Aug 13 07:42 2008 Joel Engel Print This Article

Picture a man standing bolt upright--the very image of indepen­dence, separateness. In Figure 1, look at line AD-it is straight. When one writes in such a fashion more or less consistently, we say that his writing is vertical. In line AE, however, we have a picture of a man reaching out to speak with someone, as though he were trying to meet the other person part way…

Picture a man standing bolt upright--the very image of independence,Guest Posting separateness. In Figure 1, look at line AD-it is straight. When one writes in such a fashion more or less consistently, we say that his writing is vertical. In line AE, however, we have a picture of a man reaching out to speak with someone, as though he were trying to meet the other person part way.

In line AF, we see the same as line AE, only more so. Now there is almost desperation in his urge to communicate with the other party, his need for other people. AF is quite a dependent person, all but leaning on the other man for support.

In line AC, on the other hand, we see someone withdrawing from communication, cooling off, a certain amount of rebellion present.

And in line AB, we see a kind of super AC, strongly defiant, a person who wants and demands to be alone. AC leans so far away from the other person that he is nearly falling on his back. The slant of writing is one of the most basic and important points in graphology.

When you write, your intention is simple-to tell the other person what is on your mind, to communicate. When your approach is "cool," your head (as opposed to your heart) is in control. The vertical writer may indeed have intense emotions, but they are held in check.

When writing leans to the right, we call it inclined writing. The inclined writer moves toward the party he is dealing with. The wider the degree of inclination, the stronger the urge to communicate and the stronger the feelings in general. When the writing angle is so forward that it moves into the area marked "acute," we see a person whose emotions are almost out of control, the sensitive one who blows up at the least little thing. His line of reasoning is quite off at times, for he is too emotional to evaluate situations properly. Often he becomes jealous, sentimental, and moody, and may be in desperate need of help. His warmth makes him a likable person, but his temper can easily rage. He is also a very romantic individual.

Writing with a leftward angle of inclination is called reclined writing (or sometimes backhand). Left-hand writing (by which graphologists do not mean something written with the left hand but an angle of writing that pulls toward the left) is caused by a situation in the writer's childhood-usually a relationship with his mother. The left-hand side in writing represents the past, and the fact that a man still writes with a leftward reclination show that, in one way or another, he has not grown. It may be something slight (and a slight reclination), or it may have been a very powerful experience. But whatever it was, it stunted his growth to some degree, and he now withdraws, is cool.

The idea that the writer's life history may also be the history of his left-slanted writing is not purely conjectural. In the interpretation of handwriting, the left direction quite generally has been interpreted as the direction toward the past, the mother, and oneself. If a writer chooses a left slant and maintains it in spite of its difficulties, then the story of his past, his childhood, and his relation to his mother, may tell us why. It has been my experience that writers with a left slanted hand profess a very tender feeling for their mothers.

When the writer leans into the leftward area of "acute," he is detached from society, or on his way there. This angle of writing demonstrates coldness toward others, but the coldness is actually what the writer feels within himself. He is really reverting to the womb for protection, for reassurance, for warmth. He is introverted, drawn back into himself, and thus is in retreat from the rest of the world.

It is extremely difficult to get through to the acutely left-handed writer, for he does not readily open up. He is usually quite emotional but his emotions rarely show. To some extent this is true of all left-handed writers. AC, in general, has the emotions of AE, and AB the emotions of AF (or of someone midway between AE and AF), but unlike the inclined writers, who let their emotions out, reclined writers hold them back.

It is interesting to note that people who write with their left hand rarely write reclined, but there is a certain tendency among them to write a more vertical hand than their right-handed counterparts. Notice the handwriting samples of the ambidextrous M. K. Gandhi:

Figure 2A is written with his right hand; Figure 2B, with his left. The writing with his right hand slants to the right, whereas the writing with the left is vertical.

Although a graphologist cannot with absolute certainty determine whether a particular writer is left-handed or right-handed (in the normal sense), there are hints. For instance, in the majority of cases, when a right-handed writer crosses the t bar, the left side of the bar will be thicker and the right side thinner (Figure 3). The writer's mind is on the next word, so he quickly eases up on the pressure and races on, and this is true of the left-handed writer as well. But the latter usually crosses the t bar from right to left, so the right side of the t bar will be thicker and the left side thinner (Figure 4).

What we have said about the fiery emotions of the acutely inclined writer holds true also for AF, but not so severely. Conversely, the cold withdrawal of the acutely reclined writer is similar to AB's state of mind, but to a lesser degree.

Even the AD writer is not without problems. His control over his emotions may be so complete that it is not easy for him to show feelings when they are needed. The healthiest writing is somewhere between AD and AE. The head is in control, and yet the writer is not completely detached emotionally.

In the United States the writing that is taught in school is called the Palmer Method. This is a round writing leaning to the right. When we examine handwriting, we look to see how much and in what ways the writer has deviated from this method. Variations give the grapholo¬gist much information as to the nature of the writer. No American school teaches left-hand writing, so when we see backhand, we understand how strong the person's rebellion must be.

The so-called "coolness" of the Englishman seems to be expressed in his vertical handwriting. In Germany, until recently, students were taught an inclined writing in an angular hand (round writing is "soft" writing, angular writing is "hard, rigid"), and many people felt this represented the "blood and iron" of the German national character.

One last note about reclined writers. Because their personalities are usually negative, among the male reclined writers we find a certain degree of femininity; likewise, in the women, a certain degree of masculinity. The leftward inclination represents something opposite to one's true identity.

In spite of the inclined angle his generation was taught, note that the famed revolutionary Karl Marx, author of The Communist Manifes¬to, wrote with a leftward slant:

In Figure 6, we have the right-slanted writing, with heavy pressure (to be discussed in a later chapter) of the late Sen. Hubert H. Hum¬phrey. From his script we see his gesture of reaching out toward others, a most warm personality. We also notice quite similar traits in the handwriting of Simon Bolivar (Figure 7):

Though the body of the writing (Figure 8A) slants a bit to the right, we see by the signature of Ronald Reagan (Figure 8B), which is vertical, a certain degree of "coolness." In all fairness it must be said that this signature was written quite a few years after the writing took place, so it may be said that he has gone from a "reaching out toward the people" campaign to a more conservative position.

Examination for Lesson 2

1. Independence is reflected in which type of slant?

2. Does the inclined writer have a strong urge to communicate?

Yes___ No___

3. Withdrawal is shown in which type of writing slant?

4. Explain how to determine if the writing sample was written with the left hand.

5. The type of writing that is taught in the American school system

is round and leans to the right. What is it called?

6. What type of writing slant exposes the 'coolness' of the Englishman?

7. Which writing slant reflects a certain degree of masculinity in women?

8. Consider the writing samples of Karl Marx and Hubert Humphrey. One writing reflects rebellion. Which one is it and why?

9. Which type of writing slant professes a very tender feeling towards mother?

Answers for Lesson 2

1.  Vertical (upright)

2.  Yes

3.  Reclined (left)

4.  In the majority of cases, when a right-handed writer crosses the t bar, the left side of the bar will be thicker and the right side thinner (Figure 3). The   writer's mind is on the next word, so he quickly eases up on the pressure and races on, and this is true of the left-handed writer as well, but the latter usually crosses the t bar from right to left, so the right side of the t bar will be thicker and the left side thinner.

5.  The Palmer Method

6. The vertical (upright) slant

7. The reclined (left) slant

8. The writing of Karl Marx. It is a reclined (left) slanted script.

9. Left-slanted writing.

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About Article Author

Joel Engel
Joel Engel

If you would like to view the images and answers to this article, please send an empty email to engraph@netvision.net.il

Joel Engel is the author of "Handwriting Analysis Self-Taught" (Penguin Books) http://careertest.ws http://www.learngraphology.com


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