Is America Racist Still?

Jun 5 10:07 2005 Robert Bruce Baird Print This Article

This is one entry in my Heroes and Villains Volume of an encyclopedia available at World-Mysteries.com.

OLIVER WENDELL HOLMES: - It was not until after the Nuremberg Trials that the rest of the world put the kinds of protections in place that had already been in place for a long time in Germany but we are found accusing Germans of the heinous crimes we actually lead. It is just like Mackenzie King in Canada who was backing Hitler and his programs in many areas,Guest Posting along with other blue bloods like the Bushes and their bosses the Merovingians. Oliver Wendell Holmes is considered to be a transcendentalist like Emerson who has strong ties to Carlyle and therefore the Goethe Illuminati of Weishaupt. His thoughts which are included in the following quote are not as bad as they might seem and I personally think there is merit in abortion and other forms of eugenics if done for the ‘Greater Good’.

“Beginning in 1907, with legislation passed in Indiana, forced sterilization on the basis of eugenic doctrine began spreading across the United States, with finally thirty states having such laws on the books. In this century, upwards of 50,000 Americans have been sterilized by order of the state. {Today we have drugs that reduce the libido or sex drive and potency of the less fortunate and victimized masses. These drugs and lobotomies which are still performed in Canada serve the same purposes.} The constitutionality of such compulsion was upheld in 1927, when the case Buck vs. Bell went before the Supreme Court. With only one dissent, the court said, in a majority opinion written by Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes:

‘It is better for the world, if instead of waiting to execute offspring for crime, or to let them starve for their imbecility, society can prevent those who are manifestly unfit from continuing their kind. The principle that sustains compulsory vaccination is broad enough to cover cutting the Fallopian tubes.’

The court, in other words, went beyond saying that a person is guilty until proven innocent; it declared that hypothetical persons were presumed guilty of criminal intent even before being conceived and may not be brought into existence. The 1927 decision has never been overturned, and is still a part of the law of the land.

After World War II, German lawyers defending those accused of being Nazi war criminals for having forcibly sterilized two million people as a part of Nazi racial doctrine pointed to the sterilization laws in America and the 1927 Supreme Court decision as justification for their clients' conduct.

In his recent book, The Nazi Connection: Eugenics, American Racism and National Socialism, Stefan Kühl traces the relationships between the Nazi racial theorists and members of the American eugenics movement in the 1930s. American eugenicists and German advocates of "racial hygiene" were already communicating and sharing ''scientific'' information before the First World War. The conflict in Europe, and particularly American entry into the war against Germany, broke off all such ties. But shortly after the war's end, contacts began to reemerge, with their American colleagues being especially helpful in getting German eugenicists accepted back into their community of scholars.

Throughout the 1920s, the German proponents of racial sterilization drew upon the arguments of their American counterparts, using data the American eugenicists had collected to justify the case for distinguishing between "superior" and "inferior" racial types; they also made the case that America was more enlightened and progressive in its racial policies, since numerous American states had passed sterilization laws, while German law was "backward" in its narrow defense of individual rights that frustrated equivalent German legislation.

With Hitler's coming to power in 1933, Germany's racial hygienists came into their own, with institutes for race science and research being established or expanded. They solicited articles by many of the leading American eugenicists for their "scholarly" journals, translated many of their works into German, and gave them wide distribution. The Nazis used these American books and articles to demonstrate that they were not alone in the world in advocating compulsory racial improvement and purity.

A number of American eugenicists happily cooperated. Harry L. Laughlin, who authored the "model" sterilization law for Virginia that was then copied by several other states, saw his proposals explicitly implemented in Germany's 1933 Hereditary Health Law, that prohibited racial intermarriage and codified forced sterilization in the new Germany. As a tribute, the University of Heidelberg awarded Laughlin an honorary degree in 1936, which he enthusiastically accepted.

Even in the late 1930s and early 1940s, some American eugenics publications refused to criticize Nazi race policy in general or legal persecution of the Jews in particular. Some of the leading eugenicists argued that to do so would be to unjustifiably mix science with politics.” (5)

The leader of the House Un-American Activities lynching was John Stennis who kept the real Holocaust(s) alive in his words ‘They Killed our Savior’ long after Nuremberg where the Nazis were not allowed to mount certain Synarchy defenses that might have educated the world about the truth of what happened in Germany (and Russia). Most Jews do not know their origin and often they too are abusive of other Jews like the Khazars.

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Robert Bruce Baird
Robert Bruce Baird

Author of many books
Columnist for The ES Press Magazine

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